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Link Roundup: Week of Apr. 22-28 2019 Featured

BluEdge Staff   |   April 29, 2019   |   Link Roundups

This Video Game May Help Restore Notre-Dame Cathedral To Its Original Self

This Video Game May Help Restore Notre-Dame Cathedral To Its Original Self

With the iconic Notre-Dame Cathedral set to undergo extensive renovations after the devastating fire that ripped through the church. Donations are pouring in from around the world, led by François-Henri Pinault's $113 million pledge, as officials begin to make sense of how to begin the rebuilding process. Interestingly, one fantastic source of information isn't coming from history books, but rather a video game. [My Modern Met]

This MIT Team Is Reinventing Building By Looking At The Ancient World

This MIT Team Is Reinventing Building By Looking At The Ancient World

Today, construction workers rely on cranes to lift the big slabs of concrete and other materials that go into many commercial building projects. But it hasn't always been that way; for thousands of years, humans moved monumental stones by hand. A collaboration between Boston-based Matter Design and the building materials company Cemex Global R&D attempts to return to those ancient methods–while introducing an entirely new way to move heavy concrete slabs with nothing more than human hands. [Fast Company]

History Comes Alive At These Striking New Museums

History Comes Alive At These Striking New Museums

Many of us have had the experience of visiting an exhibition and being unmoved by static displays and relics, but a crop of new museums is making a point of bringing visitors into a far more immersive space while reacquainting them with history. The design approach is strikingly multidisciplinary. Architects play a crucial role, but so do landscape architects, archivists, and even movie production designers—as exemplified by new museums coming soon to Berlin, Los Angeles, and Charleston, South Carolina. [Architectural Digest]

Redlining Was Codified Racism That Shaped American Cities And This Exhibit Shows It Still Exists

Redlining Was Codified Racism That Shaped American Cities And This Exhibit Shows It Still Exists

On maps from nearly a century ago created by the Home Owners' Loan Corporation, immigrant populations were deemed "hazardous." The presence of black people was a "detrimental influence" or an "infiltration." In the 1930s, these "residential security" maps served as guidelines for real estate professionals and loan officers. The maps categorized regions across the country that supposedly deserved investment and others that were considered too "risky" for mortgage lenders. The risk was based solely on the racial makeup of a community. [WBUR]

Lego's Newest Bricks Teach Kids To Read Braille

Lego's Newest Bricks Teach Kids To Read Braille

Lego, the toy that's given us life-sized cars and miniature wind turbines, has come up with perhaps its most ingenious product yet: bricks designed to help children learn Braille. The newly piloted bricks come molded with studs in the shape of Braille letters instead of the standard rows. The company worked with organizations from Norway, Denmark, Brazil, and the UK to develop the kit, which includes 250 bricks. Each Braille Brick has studs that represents a letter, number, or math symbol in the Braille alphabet. The bricks also come with a written representation of the letter for sighted people. [Curbed]

New York Is Banning Glass Skyscrapers. What Comes Next?

New York Is Banning Glass Skyscrapers. What Comes Next?

Earlier this month, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city's plan to ban new construction of inefficient skyscrapers as part of a major bid to tackle climate change. The proposal seeks to dramatically reduce the largest cause of greenhouse gases in the city: All-glass buildings. Until now, glass and steel have stood tall as pillars of New York City's architectural language. Throughout much of the 20th century, glass skyscrapers were seen as the ultimate architectural symbol of progress. [Architizer]

Concr3de Proposes Using 3D Printing To Rebuild Notre-Dame

Concr3de Proposes Using 3D Printing To Rebuild Notre-Dame

Dutch company Concr3de has proposed rebuilding parts of Notre-Dame Cathedral from the ashes of the fire using 3D printing, and has already printed a replacement gargoyle. Concr3de, which was founded by architects Eric Geboers and Matteo Baldassari in 2016, used 3D scans to reproduce Le Stryge, a demon statue that sits on the roof of the gothic cathedral in Paris that was severely damaged in a fire last week. A mixture of limestone and ash – similar to the materials found after the fire – was used as the material to replicate the iconic gargoyle, which was added to the cathedral's roof during the 19th century restoration by architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. [Dezeen]

Photos: Remembering Michael Wolf, Whose Photographs Captured Hong Kong's Dizzying Density

Photos: Remembering Michael Wolf, Whose Photographs Captured Hong Kong's Dizzying Density

Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities in the world, and the photographer who perhaps best captured the crammed and almost impenetrable soul of the city was Michael Wolf. The award-winning German-born photographer, perhaps best known for his 2009 series titled "Architecture of Density," passed away in his sleep at his home on the island of Cheung Chau in Hong Kong this week. He was 65. [Quartz]

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