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Link Roundup: Week of Apr. 29-May 5 2019 Featured

BluEdge Staff   |   May 6, 2019   |   Link Roundups

Anchored In The Cloud: Lasers, Digital Backups, And The Future Of Landmark Preservation

Anchored In The Cloud: Lasers, Digital Backups, And The Future Of Landmark Preservation

On the evening of Monday, April 15, as the horrific blaze that originated on the roof of Notre Dame spread, worst case scenarios led many to contemplate the irreplaceable loss of the architectural icon. But, as a global audience watched and waited on social media, there was a piece of good news: a high-tech blueprint of the church existed. In 2010, a time-consuming, five-day laser scan of the cathedral had been done by late art historian and Vassar College professor Andrew Tallon. He was able to create a 3D model of the building by capturing one billion points of data, a detailed digital blueprint for any future restorations or repairs, and one of the highest-profile examples of how this new type of record is reshaping how the world protects its great buildings and historic sites. [Curbed]

Why Neon Is The Ultimate Symbol Of The 20th Century

Why Neon Is The Ultimate Symbol Of The 20th Century

In the summer of 1898, the Scottish chemist Sir William Ramsay made a discovery that would eventually give the Moulin Rouge in Paris, the Las Vegas Strip, and New York's Times Square their perpetual nighttime glow. Using the boiling point of argon as a reference point, Ramsay and his colleague Morris W. Travers isolated three more noble gases and gave them evocative Greek names: neon, krypton, and xenon. In so doing, the scientists bestowed a label of permanent novelty on the most famous of the trio—neon, which translates as "new." This discovery was the foundation on which the French engineer Georges Claude crafted a new form of illumination over the next decade. He designed glass tubes in which neon gas could be trapped, then electrified, to create a light that glowed reliably for more than 1,000 hours. [CityLab]

10 Drawings That Changed Architecture

10 Drawings That Changed Architecture

Architectural drawing is an act of communication. Creating both a vision for what could be and detailing the technical relationships of design and construction, architects use drawings as a way to explore, express and share their ideas. From the basic concept of architecture as shelter, there are now countless definitions of what the built environment should provide. In turn, those definitions are continuously shaped by drawings. Looking across history, drawings have been used throughout millennia as a way to imagine new realities and rethink the world around us. But they have also changed architecture itself. [Architizer]

8 Modern Spire Designs for the Reconstruction of Notre-Dame

8 Modern Spire Designs for the Reconstruction of Notre-Dame

In the wake of the tragic fire that partially destroyed Paris' beloved Notre-Dame Cathedral, the French government has begun thinking about how to move forward. Recently, French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe told journalists that the government would be putting out an international call for architects to propose their ideas of how to reconstruct the roofline and the iconic spire that dramatically collapsed during the fire. Rather than sticking with tradition, he reportedly said that France wasn't looking for a repeat of what was, but rather "a new spire that is adapted to the techniques and the challenges of our era." [My Modern Met]

The Bauhaus: The Design Utopia We're Still Living In

The Bauhaus: The Design Utopia We're Still Living In

It's been 100 years since architect Walter Gropius transformed a cloistered German art school into arguably the most influential modern design academy in history. Built on utopian principles, the Bauhaus sounded like a creative wunderland: Printing! Carpentry! Dance! Ceramics! Painting! Have we mentioned dance? The Bauhaus bubble lasted for only 14 years, but its influence reverberates in just about every aspect of modern life today. For better or worse, its DNA is manifest in minimalist home furniture, the shape of tech products, whimsical Halloween costumes, and boxy architecture all over the world. [Quartz]

This Gorgeous Museum Is Made From Old Jet Fuel Tanks

This Gorgeous Museum Is Made From Old Jet Fuel Tanks

You've probably seen aviation fuel containers at the airport: those giant, rusty cylinders, usually painted white. It's hard to believe that such ugly structures could be turned into a beautiful art space like Tank Shanghai. Designed by American-Chinese studio Open Architecture, this cultural center was made from five decommissioned oil containers and a pool for fire-fighting at the Longhua Airport, all sitting a on a stretch of the Huangpu River, in Shanghai. [Fast Company]

10 Buildings That Helped Define Modernism In New York City

10 Buildings That Helped Define Modernism In New York City

Eighty-five years on, the little white town house on East 48th Street by William Lescaze still startles. With its bright stucco and Purist volumes, it pulls the eye away from the do-nothing brownstones on one side and the noirish sub-Miesian tower on the other. The machined rectitude of its upper floors, telegraphed by two clumsily large spans of glass block, is offset by the freer plastic arrangement of the bottom levels. Le Corbusier’s five points are in evidence (minus the roof garden), suggesting an architecture ready to do battle. [Metropolis]

Unreal Archaeology - How The Ancient World Is Being Recreated In Virtual Reality

Unreal Archaeology - How The Ancient World Is Being Recreated In Virtual Reality

Archaeological field work typically involves lots of dirt, sun, and at least an insect or two, but archaeologist David R. Hixson of Hood College is opening new frontiers to bring archaeology into the world of virtual reality. While he still keeps a trowel in his back pocket, Hixson now regularly works with drones, digital photography, photogrammetry and three-dimensional imaging software in his attempts to understand the human past. At the same time, the expansion of virtual reality technology is opening possibilities for the public to experience the ancient world in entirely new ways. The age of virtual archaeology has arrived! [Forbes]

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